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Ryūtarō Nakamura
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Birth

April 15, 1955 (Japan)

Death

June 29, 2013 (58 y.o.)

Occupation

Director

Notable Works

Serial Experiments Lain
Kino's Journey
Ghost Hound

Ryūtarō Nakamura (中村 隆太郎), born April 15, 1955,was a Japanese director and animator, best known for directing the landmark anime series Serial Experiments Lain, and for his collaborations with Chiaki J. Konaka.

He was responsible for directing for the planned project Despera before his death on June 29, 2013.


Biography[]

After working at Madhouse, he became a freelance director in 1986. During this period, it was influenced by Osamu Dezaki which brought his unique visuals.

In 1994, he made his directorial debut in The Life of Budori Gusuko. He then gained famed by directing the anime series Serial Experiments Lain in 1998, where he worked for the first time with Chiaki J. Konaka.

After Serial Experiments Lain, Ryūtarō Nakamura continued to work with Chiaki J. Konaka on two other projects the anime movie The Movie Keno's Journey [1] and the anime series Ghost Hound.

In 2009, it was announced that he would be working on a new project: Despera. Production was put on hold due to Nakamura suffering from an unspecified illness. Following several months of hospitalization due to pancreatic cancer, he died on June 29, 2013. His death was announced nearly a month after [2].

Notable Works[]

Tomcat's Big Adventure (1992) Anime movie Director, Script, Storyboard, Composition
The Life of Budori Gusuko (1994) Anime movie Director, Script
Serial Experiments Lain (1998) Anime television series Series composition, Script
Sakura Wars (2000) Anime television series Series director, Continuity
Rec (2006) Anime television series Director, Storyboard
Kino's Journey: Country of Illness —For You— (2007) Anime movie Director
Ghost Hound (2007) Anime television series Director
Jūgo Shōnen Hyōryūki Kaizokujima DE! Daibōken (2013) Anime movie Director (Posthumous)

Trivia[]

  • Following Ryūtarō Nakamura's death, Chiaki J. Konaka called Ghost Hound as now memorable.


Citations[]

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